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Ingyenes szállítás 10.000 Ft felett

 
FOREWORD"In Greek history," says Mr. Robinson, "little that happened mattered much; it is what the Greeks thought that counted." It has counted so much, indeed, that no one of us can enter into his European cultural inheritance without some knowledge of what the Greeks thought. Study of the Greeks...
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FOREWORD"In Greek history," says Mr. Robinson, "little that happened mattered much; it is what the Greeks thought that counted." It has counted so much, indeed, that no one of us can enter into his European cultural inheritance without some knowledge of what the Greeks thought. Study of the Greeks transcends antiquarianism: their experience is permanently relevant and perennially capable of providing illumination and direction for our own spiritual problems.It is upon this illumination that Mr. Robinson has focused his book; his aim is to present the aspects of Greek history that are of abiding and direct interest to the thoughtful modern. In the sense that a span requiring six stout volumes of the Cambridge Ancient History is here dealt with in fewer than two hundred pages, this is a popularization; but it is a popularization of the right sort, done by a mature scholar whose more technical work compels respect for his general interpretations.The analogies and examples in this book are mainly British because the author is an EngUshman. He uses (and very aptly) words like "Gestapo" and "Quishng" because he wrote it in 1946. And there is a sense of exultation in democracy because democracy had just won a difficult war against its enemies. The original title was Zito Hellas: A Popular History of Ancient Greece. "Zito Hellas" means "Long live Greece!"MOSES HADASINTRODUCTION"Nothing moves in the world," it has been said, "which is not Greek in origin." "Yes, but," the critic replies, "the lesson has been learnt long since: whatever matters in Classical Culture is by now absorbed into the life-blood of our civilization; further study of it seems superfluous." This is wholly to misconceive the function and influence of the Classical spirit. Throughout the centuries Greek thought has displayed an unfailing capacity to kindle thought in others, and there is scarcely a turning-point in Western history at which its explosive force has not been at work. First it broke through the cramping walls of the small Greek states wliich bred it, and diffused itself into the larger atmosphere of Alexander's Empire, transforming the whole life and outlook of the Near East. Next it penetrated the mind of Rome, shattering the narrow conservatism of the Republican regime, animating with its cultural ideals the men who governed the Empire, and finally laying the intellectual foundations of the Christian Church. At the Renaissance it scattered the mists of mediaeval obscurantism and opened aU manner of new horizons for individual initiative. Lastly, ir inspired the philosophic ideas which underlay the French Revolution and thus helped to launch the Common Man on his fumbling, painful and still unfinished search for a better world-order. For this is the way of the Greek spirit. It destroys, but it destroys to rebuild; and the constructive impulse, whether its origin be acknowledged or no, is stiU operative among us to-day. The more we are able therefore to understand the principles of its working, the better for ourselves and posterity.In all spheres of lifereligious, artistic, educational and the rest stagnation of the human spirit sets in when Means are mistaken for Ends, when rituahsm, for example, is made a substitute for worship, when technical skill takes precedence over the search for beauty, or when pedantry obscures the true appreciation of literature. No age can escape the temptation; but in a scientific age the temptation is perhaps strongest of all. The opportunities which Science holds out are so dazzling that it seems fatally easy to think them desirable in themselves. Yet obviously it is the use to which they are put that determines their value. The very same means which, if rightly used, may carry us into Utopia, might
Termékadatok
Cím: Hellas [antikvár]
Szerző: C. E. Robinson
Kiadó: Beacon Press
Kötés: Ragasztott papírkötés
Méret: 140 mm x 200 mm
C. E. Robinson művei
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