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Ingyenes szállítás 10.000 Ft felett

 
focal point Why Astronomers Should Love SDI CERRO TOLOLO, Arecibo, Sacramento Peak, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) — what do these major observatories have in common? To the surprise, and shock, of certain astronomers, they all started as military projects. The first large telescope at Cerro...
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2940 Ft
Szállítás: 3-7 munkanap
Személyes ajánlatunk Önnek

Sky & Telescope October 1982 [antikvár]

Eugene Kranz, Jesse L. Greenstein, Kenneth Gatland

online ár: Webáruházunkban a termékek mellett feltüntetett fekete színű online ár csak internetes megrendelés esetén érvényes.
2940 Ft

Sky & Telescope December 2002 [antikvár]

Charles A. Wood, Joe Heafner, Stuart J. Goldman

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2940 Ft

Sky & Telescope December 1982 [antikvár]

David H. DeVorkin, J. Harvey, M. Pomerantz

online ár: Webáruházunkban a termékek mellett feltüntetett fekete színű online ár csak internetes megrendelés esetén érvényes.
2940 Ft

Sky & Telescope December 2000 [antikvár]

Charles A. Wood, Gary Seronik, Stuart J. Goldman

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2940 Ft

Sky & Telescope May 2002 [antikvár]

Alan Dyer, E. C. Krupp

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2940 Ft

Sky & Telescope May 1982 [antikvár]

Don L. Manley, Frank Reddy, Sun Kwok

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2940 Ft

Sky & Telescope August 2002 [antikvár]

Dan Durda, David H. Levy, E. C. Krupp

online ár: Webáruházunkban a termékek mellett feltüntetett fekete színű online ár csak internetes megrendelés esetén érvényes.
2940 Ft

Sky & Telescope November 2000 [antikvár]

Gary Seronik, Govert Schilling, Stuart J. Goldman

online ár: Webáruházunkban a termékek mellett feltüntetett fekete színű online ár csak internetes megrendelés esetén érvényes.
2940 Ft
Részletesen erről a termékről
Bővebb ismertető
focal point Why Astronomers Should Love SDI CERRO TOLOLO, Arecibo, Sacramento Peak, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) — what do these major observatories have in common? To the surprise, and shock, of certain astronomers, they all started as military projects. The first large telescope at Cerro Tololo in Chile, a 60-inch, was built in part with defense money. Sacramento Peak Observatory in New Mexico started in 1947 as an Air Force project. The Navy built the world's largest radio dish at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, for atmospheric research. Finally, HST bears a dominant legacy from photoreconnaissance satellites. The technology for our next advances in astronomy is on the drawing boards today — and they are defense drawing boards. Ironically, almost all are in the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program, which some astronomers are falling all over themselves to avoid. SDI contains one fabulous project that astronomers should be lining up for. In the mid-1990's a lO-meter-cIass telescope will begin operation at White Sands, New Mexico. It will direct multi-megawatt free-electron laser beams up through the atmosphere — completely corrected for air turbulence! Once the Department of Defense (DOD) is done with its tests this half-billion-dollar telescope is likely to be turned over to the scientific community. In addition, tens of millions of dollars from SDI flow annually into astronomically related technologies. Most of the nation's large-segmented-mirror work is SDI-funded. Almost all synthetic-aperture and atmospheric-compensation technology has a "Made by Star Warriors" label. This includes a major program at Kitt Peak National Observatory and much of our infrared and ultraviolet sensor development and X-ray optics research. Perhaps SDl's most significant contribution to astronomy is its large-space-optics program. Without SDI, work in this area just wouldn't exist. By the time the United States completes its SDI research in the mid-1990's, we will have demonstrated a 10-meter-class telescope in orbit. Moreover, we will have proved that we can phase several such telescopes for an effective aperture of 50 meters or more. These optical systems will revolutionize astronomy, enabling us to see Earth-size planets orbiting nearby stars. Our next-genera- tion space telescope will have an SDI logo. Thoughtful astronomers might ask why we need SDI to do these things. This is a legitimate — albeit naive — question. If you think Congress will appropriate half a billion dollars for a 10-meter active-optics telescope and a few billion more for a similar instrument in space, I have an AIDS cure to sell you. Senator William Proxmire's comment a few years ago concerning additional funds for HST is instructive. "The stars will still be around tomorrow," he said, "but our pressing social problems are with us today." Scientists' naivete in the 1970's resulted in the Mansfield Amendment barring basic research by the Department of Defense. Civilian scientists pushed this move in hopes that the DOD money would flow to the National Science Foundation (NSF). The result: half a billion dollars' worth of DOD research went down the drain — NSF didn't get enough of an increase to pay to close down the DOD programs it inherited. The choice is not between "clean" civilian and "dirty" SDI work; it is between SDI or nothing at all. The politically committed astronomer might assert, "We have a moral duty to stop an evil and ill-advised government program." Very well, but since when are astronomers competent to advise on matters of national military strategy? SDI's primary rationale is political and strategic, not technical. The technical issues that do exist are engineering questions, not astro-physical ones, and recent surveys show that engineers are far more supportive of SDI than their physical-scientist colleagues. In any case, I have difficulty with those opposing SDI on moral grounds. It certainly seems more moral to base our security on non-nuclear means than on mass-murder weapons as SDI's critics advocate. Protests against SDI are more than a bit hypocritical. Would you prefer to drink water 100 yards downstream from an outhouse simply because the pollutant is out of sight? This is exactly what SDI critics do! The same Congress appropriates NSF, NASA, and SDI money. The same administration that has made SDI its highest priority collects taxes and administers all of these programs. What level of pollutant is acceptable? If SDI gave NASA $1, would that be enough to pollute the space agency? What about $1 million, or even $100 million? The latter number is closest. The only consist- ent position for SDI critics is to refuse to accept any U. S. funds. I am eager to see the long list of names on that petition. I repeat President Reagan's 1983 challenge. America's scientists have been charged with developing tools to help us move away from the current nuclear-deterrent relationship with the Soviet Union. If you think this is impossible, then have the guts to do the hard technical work to prove you are right or get out of the way for others who think it is possible. Astronomers will benefit in unimaginable ways. We might even repay our fellow citizens for their past support of our scientific endeavors. SIMON R WORDEN Pete Warden is Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, a lieutenant colonel in the U. S. Air Force, and an astronomer who has done pioneering research in solar and stellar physics. Why Star Wars Is Bad for Astronomy STAR WARS — a surprise even to the president's own scientific advisors when announced in 1983 — is a "vision" of protecting the civilian population of the United States from an all-out Soviet strate- .Jü^^tr-
Termékadatok
Cím: Sky & Telescope October 1987 [antikvár]
Szerző: David A. Allen , Roger W. Sinnott , Virginia Trimble William Tobin
Kiadó: Sky Publishing Corporation
Kötés: Tűzött kötés
Méret: 220 mm x 280 mm
David A. Allen művei
Roger W. Sinnott művei
Virginia Trimble művei
William Tobin művei
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