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Ingyenes szállítás 10.000 Ft felett

 
Coming: More Hype! Yikes!! Fasten your seat belts — here we go again! The media blitz last December that touted the brightest Moon in 133 years is probably still fresh in your mind. But I'll bet a lot of you have already forgotten the name of the asteroid that only two years ago was destined...
2940 Ft
Szállítás: 3-7 munkanap
Személyes ajánlatunk Önnek
Részletesen erről a termékről
Bővebb ismertető
Coming: More Hype! Yikes!! Fasten your seat belts — here we go again! The media blitz last December that touted the brightest Moon in 133 years is probably still fresh in your mind. But I'll bet a lot of you have already forgotten the name of the asteroid that only two years ago was destined to do us in. (Recently I read that the movie industry made a billion bucks off its two Earth-smashing thrillers, so at least somebody had fun!) Astronomy information for the masses has become badly fragmented. There are the endless "greatest discovery ever" stories cranked out by flacks. And there are the "dumb" stories, the rehashes that Ann Finkbeiner wrote about so eloquently in last month's Focal Point (page 10). And there are the ordinary sky events that the press often misplays. Inadequately described or overly hyped visible celestial events are sure to frustrate the public, who can go out and see (or not see) what's happening. Except for possible ennui, the dumb stories are innocuous, and flashy graphics might well keep everyone happily engaged. Even the gee-whiz stuff has a place — it keeps the press spotlight on astronomy. Now . . . enter the clowns! I'm referring, of course, to folks who produce the science pollution that Ed Krupp tenderly savaged in last month's Ramblings (page 93), in the context of this May's planetary "alignment." Are these prophets of doom merely false or are they simply, and cunningly, cashing in on what seems to be an ever-increasing public appetite for fear? (By the way, if you want to waste lots of time, type "May 5, 2000" into your Web browser and explore many silly sites.) I get frustrated at how much time our editors spend on such nonevents as they answer questions from naive reporters. The upcoming alignment and accompanying hype will keep our phones jumping for days or weeks as we're called for the obligatory quote to lace stories that are destined to soon wrap fish. If you believe that there is no such thing as bad publicity, all this seems good for astronomy. But I can't imagine it will last. Hype and nuttiness have gone from occasional to continual. The public will become jaded. I was amazed at January's meeting of the American Astronomical Society to find that a loony had slipped through its quality-control net to give a paper, pass out a press release, and man a booth. A triple-play first? Craftiness or negligence? Who knows? But a trap for a credulous reporter. We live in hugely exciting times. Astronomical discoveries are pouring forth in such a torrent that even expert scribes, paddling furiously, can barely maintain headway. But astronomy also suffers from disappointments — from broken meteor showers to broken Mars probes. Gosh, with all the real stuff — good or bad, hyped or not — no one needs dilution by pollution.
Termékadatok
Cím: Sky & Telescope May 2000 [antikvár]
Szerző: Charles A. Wood , David H. Levy Gary Seronik
Kiadó: Sky Publishing Corporation
Kötés: Ragasztott papírkötés
Méret: 220 mm x 280 mm
Charles A. Wood művei
David H. Levy művei
Gary Seronik művei
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